In my personal opinion, I think the way that we deal with substance use and abuse in the United States is completely insane. Firstly, the idea that someone should be imprisoned for doing what they want to their own body (as long as they aren’t in a situation where they could potentially hurt someone – ex. driving a vehicle)  is absolutely ludicrous, and secondly, we have a nasty tendency to lump all substances in the same category.

I promise there’s a big difference between the guy in the corner who is having a spiritual, life changing experience on a psychedelic substance while listening to Pink Floyd and trying to spread peace on love on Earth, and the heroin addict who is ready to sell all of their belongings or shoot someone in order to get their next fix.

Recent scientific studies that have been conducted over the last several years have shown that psychedelic substances in particular have long lasting, positive impacts on psychological health. They can help treat depression, PTSD, and several other mental disorders.

I realize that most people maintain a healthy degree of skepticism towards the psychedelic experience, and that’s important. It’s not something that you should take lightly. But let’s not throw the baby out with the bath water. These substances could potentially be the future for treating psychiatric disorders.

The most legendary advocate of the psychedelic experience was the one and only – Terence McKenna. If you haven’t heard of him, I highly recommend you do a YouTube search and listen to some of his lectures. The man was a genius. He’s an enormous hero of mine.

Unfortunately he passed away 18 years ago, so you won’t be able to attend one of his legendary lectures in person. However, his brother – Dennis McKenna – is still hard at work, carrying on the McKenna family legacy. He’s an ethnopharmacologist, research pharmacognosist , lecturer, author and has Ph.D.

He does a wonderful job educating the general public on the place, importance, and value of the psychedelic experience. He’ll be giving a lecture July 7th at Sundin Music Hall at Hamline University in St. Paul. The event starts at 2 pm and you can purchase a ticket now for $20.