3-D PRINTED CASTS?

How awesome would this be? You break your arm, and instead of having to have a fiberglass cast that covers your arm for months, dealing with the uncomfortable 'can't reach it" itchiness, the smelly grossness of skin being covered for months without being washed or able to breathe freely, you could have a cast like this! Hats off to 3-D Printers.

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Watch what's happening at the Mayo Clinic in the video below.

Mayo Clinic/Youtube

Photo by Tom Claes on Unsplash
Photo by Tom Claes on Unsplash
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According to an article I read on LinkedIn, It takes about 90 minutes to scan the injured area and turn it into a digital model, and then is printed using a 3-D Printer. The material used is a waterproof polymer material that can get wet; so the person who has to wear the cast can sweat, and bathe, and because of the material, have a much more hygenic experience.

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Photo by Tom Claes on Unsplash
Photo by Tom Claes on Unsplash
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FIBERGLASS  TO POLYMER

According to Dr. Montero, "The new 3-D printed casts, allow active individuals to stay active, unlike traditional fiberglass casts that can't get wet. Fiberglass casts transmit the force of impact to the bone, whereas the new 3-D Splints disperse the force evenly across the surface, making it more durable as well."

THE MAYO CLINIC

Currently, individuals 10 years of age and older with traditional wrist fractures are candidates for this new way of casting. At the time of the article in March of this year, the only place this was happening was at The Mayo Clinic in Florida, not Minnesota. Let's hope that this is a breakthrough in science and that it will soon be the standard for casting in years to come.

 

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